British Columbia Sun

Ottawa discloses its newest goal to grow 2 billion trees by 2030

Ottawa

Key takeaways: 

  • Plan ramps up to 300 million trees in the land yearly by 2027, the government states.
  • The federal government has unleashed its latest plan to grow two billion trees by 2030.

Ottawa’s latest plan to grow 2 billion trees by 2030: 

Ottawa has trusted Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) with the job and it has offered it a decade to complete. According to the newest figures, NRCAN hopes its associates to grow 30 million trees this year and double that digit next year, ramping up to 300 million trees each year by 2027.

“I think that’s important for Canadians to understand that the program is on track,” Natural Resources Minister Jonathan Wilkinson informed the media. “But it’s also necessary for them to be able to follow progress going forward, to confirm that we’re doing what we said we were going to do.” Source – cbc.ca

In 2019, the Liberals declared that their plan to combat weather change and improve biodiversity would implicate growing adequately trees to cover a region twice the size of Prince Edward Island.

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Ottawa’s plan to plant 2 billion trees by 2030

Since then, NRCAN officials have performed behind the scenes to develop a program that recaps where seeds will be sourced, how areas will be designed for planting and how the saplings will be observed after they’re in the ground.

The department founded its dual round of grant applications for interested associations, municipalities and governments on Thursday. According to the government, the first round noticed Ottawa sign contracts with at least 59 associations worth more than $21 million.

The McLeod Lake First Nation near Prince George, B.C. obtained $2,150,000 for its task — named Gat’ Azi-gat’ Cho, or “Little Trees – Big Trees.” The band grew millions of trees after its forests were destroyed by a spruce budworm infestation. “We planted 4.3 million spruce and pine seedlings using our crews,” stated Chief Harley Chingee. “It was a very useful project.” Source – cbc.ca

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