British Columbia Sun

Canadians 50 and above must take a COVID-19 booster shot

Covid vaccine

Key takeaways: 

  • The vaccine advisory committee also suggests grown-ups aged 18-49 take the 3rd shot six months later in their 2nd dose.
  • The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is now completely suggesting Canadians above the age of 50 and other weak groups take the third dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

NACI advises adults aged 50 and above must take the 3rd shot: 

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) is now “completely recommending” that all Canadians above the age of 50 and other weak people — such as health care workers, Indigenous people and those living in congregate load settings — take the third dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

In the latest report published today, NACI — an autonomous body made up of volunteer vaccine specialists — also calls on Canadians aged 18 to 49 to take a third mRNA shot at least six months after they received their second.

With the virus still reporting extensively, advisory panels in other nations — such as the one that operates with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) — have been suggesting for weeks an increase to the booster shot campaign to reach more people.

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Covid
Vaccine board

NACI’s support gives the regions and nations the leeway to dramatically increase the currently limited booster shot campaign.

The COVID-19 vaccines approved by Health Canada have shown to be very efficient against disease, critical disease, hospitalization and death. NACI stated it’s advising booster shots now because rising data recommend that shield against disease is declining over time for those who made a two-dose vaccine regimen.

“Declining protection against virus could contribute to escalated transmission, since infected individuals may be a source of infection for others,” the committee stated in its report. “Therefore, a booster dose may give more durable power to overcome the infection, transmission, and in some populations, extreme disease.” Source – cbc.ca

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