British Columbia Sun

Day passes will continue to be required at three famous B.C. Parks

BC

Key takeaways: 

  • Visitors accessing Garibaldi, Golden Ears, and Joffre Lakes parks ought to reserve passes from B.C. Parks.
  • Joffre Lakes Provincial Park was founded in 1988. 
  • Since then, it has become one of the most famous parks in B.C. 

To handle the volume of visitors to three of B.C.’s most famous parks, the regional government will continue to need campers to book day-use passes.

Effective June 17, visitors will require to book free day passes for Golden Ears Park, Joffre Lakes Park, and three trailheads at Garibaldi Provincial Park during peak hours. The passes can be booked at B.C. Parks online two days in advance.

Passes can also be revoked online.

In a report, the B.C. government said it is extending the day-use pass program “to balance increasing numbers of visitors and preserving the natural environment.”

¬†“Overuse has become an increasing challenge in these three parks. We need to assure that we protect what makes these parks special through sustainable recreation,” stated B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman.

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o handle the volume of visitors to three of B.C.’s most famous parks, the regional government will continue to need campers to book day-use passes

Golden Ears Park and three of Garibaldi Park’s trailheads will need vehicle passes, while Joffre Lakes Park will ask each individual for an individual trail pass.

Discover Parks representatives will administer the program.

The region states it continues to improve the program. It is a valuable tool to lower the impact of visitors on the environment and control packed parking lots, roads, and trails. 

“An unmanaged boost in visitors can result in trail wear and vegetation trampling, wildlife displacement, and impacts to Indigenous cultural values,” said the province. 

B.C. Parks is funding $21.5 million for outdoor recreation, including adding campsites and boosting facilities.

Source – cbc.ca

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