British Columbia Sun

Beachcombers get to see B.C.’s lowest tides in a decade today

BC

Key takeaways: 

  • The low tides from natural elements — including the moon’s place — line up flawlessly.
  • Tides are induced by the gravitational force of the sun and moon.

The lowest tides in nearly a decade will grace B.C.’s South Coast today, with various natural elements making the ideal situation for combing the beach for creatures and gems. 

Low tide is predicted to strike just after noon in Vancouver and just before noon in White Rock, a municipality south of Vancouver around the U.S. border. The lowest tides in Victoria are anticipated at approximately 9:30 a.m. and 8:45 p.m.

Tides are generated by the gravitational force of the sun and moon.

CBC meteorologist Johanna Wagstaffe states these low tides result from three cycles lined up flawlessly. 

First, spring tides — when tides leap from intense highs to severe lows and line up with the full moon — are presently in effect.

Second: the full moon overnight is the nearest it will be to Earth in 2022.

“It might not sound like much in astronomical words, but the moon being that much closer will have that much of an additional pull on our tides,” Wagstaffe said. 

Also read: Corn growers in Fraser Valley dealing with crop delays after unseasonably wet climate

The lowest tides in nearly a decade will grace B.C.’s South Coast today, with various natural elements making the ideal situation for combing the beach for creatures and gems

Third, the rise of the moon’s 18.6-year cycle, also known as the Lunar Standstill, is fast approaching. The peak appears in 2024-2025, but visual effects open for at least three years. 

‘A great chance to learn’

Low tides make for a good time to strike the beach and look at intertidal creatures, which may not be seen otherwise.

Alison Wood, the education organization Ocean Ambassadors co-founder, states she has been out with her summer camp children, checking out what low tides offer.

“It makes digging in the intertidal area fun,” she said.

Specifically, she and her team have been able to spot sea stars, limpets, and crabs.

“There are many for them to see.”

Source – CBC News

Show More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.