British Columbia Sun

B.C. is paying $12M to aid internationally-educated nurses to get licensed

BC

Key takeaways: 

  • Funding has bursaries for 1,500 nurses to cover application and assessment costs.
  • It also has bursaries for 1,500 nurses — up to $16,000 individually.

The region is paying $12 million to support internationally-educated nurses to get registered and licensed quickly in B.C., expecting the action will help manage a staffing crunch in the field.

Officials said Tuesday the grant should trim the long and intricate licensing procedure, which can take up to two years for nurses educated outside Canada.

It also has bursaries for 1,500 nurses — up to $16,000 separately — to help spend for the series of national and regional assessments needed to be licensed in B.C.

“The process for globally educated nurses is difficult, it’s expensive, and it’s long. In a time when we require nurses, and we require people to utilize the skills they have … is no longer, I think, acceptable,” Health Minister Adrian Dix stated Tuesday.

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The region is paying $12 million to support internationally-educated nurses to get registered and licensed

Presently, applications and assessments can cost a coming nurse at least $4,200. If they require to upgrade their education, it can cost thousands more.

Nurses’ groups stated they have heard of nurses from the U.S., U.K., Australia, Ireland, India, and the Philippines who have worked with the bulky licensing and registration procedures.

“It costs a lot. You reach here, attempting to begin your life … People give up, and many individuals have given up,” stated Clifford Belgica. He leads the B.C. chapter of the Philippine Nurses Association. “It’s tragic, the situation we’re in right now.”

With changes taking result this May, nurses will be able to apply to be considered for numerous positions — like a health-care assistant, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse — at the same time instead of one by one.

Source – cbc.ca

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