British Columbia Sun

Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Rising Singer Mighloe channels all her blazing sentiments through an R&B alter-ego

Key points: 

  • The Pickering, Ont., Singer clears about her proceeding journey of musical self-discovery. 
  • Mighloe is in travellers mode right now. 

Mighloe’s blazing emotions channelling through R&B alter ego: 

The Pickering, Ont., R&B performer is presently calling from London, England, where she just landed some hours ago, and while she is dazed from the jet lag she seems to be twinkling with excitement to tour the culture of a brand new city. 

This marks one of her solemn business tours, one as an artist looking to discover innovation, and collaborators, for the latest music. 

Growing Up, Wheeler did not recognize singing could convert into a real career. In her mind, you had to be “one of the chosen ones,” like her role model Whitney Houston, Janis Joplin or Otis Redding, to become an expert artist. But approximately five years ago, a light bulb blew off: Wheeler entered a recording studio for the first time and finished a song. That incident, plus the words of heartening from those who heard her song, pushed her to know that chasing a career in music was very much a probability. 

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As an outcome of that epiphany, Wheeler chose to drop out of post-secondary school, where she was learning Criminal Justice, and look out for people and programs that could aid her to construct a craft. 

She registered in the Remix Project, A Toronto corporation that assists young people from marginalized and under-served communities who are attempting to enter into imaginative industries and whose alumni include Wondagurl, FrancisGotHeat and Jessie Reyez. 

“That’s what really shaped Mighloe,” Wheeler explains, often considering her artist name as a brave and fearless alter ego in contrast to the more brooding side she retreats to in her day-to-day life. “[The Remix Project] really taught me everything that comes with being an artist because there’s more than just writing music and putting it out. They taught me a level of competence that I didn’t have before and taught me how to enter a room and make myself known in those spaces.” Source – cbc.ca

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