British Columbia Sun

B.C. construction boss imprisoned and firm fined $25K over workplace safety problems

BC

Key takeaways: 

  • Dalwinder Singh Kandola and G & D Construction Ltd. were condemned for breaking the 2017 court order.
  • The firm has been fined $25,000, and its director was convicted of 14 days in prison for contempt of court.

The director of a Metro Vancouver construction firm is headed to prison after repeated workplace safety infringements in defiance of a court injunction.

Dalwinder Singh Kandola and G & D Construction Ltd. (GDCL) were found in hatred of court last month. The firm was fined $25,000, and Kandola was punished with 14 days behind bars.

Kandola and his company have yet been instructed to pay more than $43,000 for breaches of the Workers Compensation Act and civil contempt, according to a May 18 decision from B.C. Supreme Court Justice Sheila Tucker.

But so far, she stated, those fines have had “little to no effect.”

“In my view, a penalty that goes above financial is required,” Tucker wrote.

Also read: Truck crash with Cambie Road overpass in Richmond shuts Highway 99 lanes

The director of a Metro Vancouver construction firm is headed to prison after repeated workplace safety infringements in defiance of a court injunction

“In treating the penalties set to date as a cost of doing business, Mr. Kandola has put GDCL’s workers at risk of harm, shown rudeness for the court, and made the appearance of operating with impunity.”

WorkSafeBC won an injunction against Kandola and his firm in October 2017, when a B.C. Supreme Court justice mandated him to comply with workplace safety rules.

According to the judgment, most safety breaches concern difficult situations for people working at heights and the absence of protection from falls.

It details several WorkSafeBC reviews of worksites between 2018 and 2020 that saw missing guardrails and fall protection plans, a lack of safety training, and a failure to abide by stop-work orders for construction past 10 feet.

Those findings directed administrative penalties of more than $30,000 and $8,000 in court-ordered fines for contempt.

Source – cbc.ca

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